Changemaker Award

This award recognizes emerging leaders and advocates who are finding creative ways to build a more just, organic, sustainable, and diverse agriculture/food system for all. It celebrates those who may be working within marginalized sectors and who empower community to farm in ways that are environmentally regenerative, socially just, and economically viable so we all can grow in a world of hope and abundance.

The MOSES Board of Directors presents the award at the annual MOSES Organic Farming Conference.

Recommend a Changemaker

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Congratulations to the 2020 Changemakers:
Steve Acheson
Bad River Food Sovereignty Program
Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin

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2020 Changemaker

 

Steve Acheson

Peacefully Organic Produce
Veterans for Compassionate Care
S.C. WI Hemp Producers Co-op

Steve Acheson and his wife, Stephanie Krueger

Steve Acheson is an Iraq war veteran from Blanchardville, Wisconsin. He started Peacefully Organic Produce, a certified organic produce farm where he grew healthy food for his community for several years, employed other veterans, and taught many community members how to farm organically. The farm hosted an annual concert to raise money for “Veggies for Vets,” a program Steve created to provide free weekly CSA shares to at-risk veterans in the area. He also started a farmers market at the local Veterans hospital and educated vets about healthy eating. 

In 2016, when his war injuries made it impossible to continue farming, Steve turned his attention to getting medical cannabis legalized in Wisconsin. Like other injured vets, Steve was prescribed multiple medications and found that medical cannabis did a better job managing his pain. He helped create Wisconsin Veterans for Compassionate Care to advocate for legalized cannabis.

Recently, Steve co-founded the South Central WI Hemp Producers Cooperative to help growers buy seed, market collectively, and gain more equity in the supply chain.

Learn more about Steve in this acceptance speech.

Read Steve’s profile in the Organic Broadcaster.

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2020 Changemaker

 

Bad River Food Sovereignty Program

Loretta Livingston & Joy Schelble

Joy Schelble and Loretta Livingston run the Bad River Food Sovereignty Program.

Loretta Livingston and Joy Schelble work together to restore traditional foodways and create access to healthy foods through the Bad River Food Sovereignty Program in northern Wisconsin. A lawyer by training, Loretta is a past chair of the Tribal Council and is a respected Elder in the community. Joy, who has a degree in botany, is the 4-H Youth Development Coordinator with the University of Wisconsin-Extension. Through the Bad River Food Sovereignty Program, Loretta and Joy are teaching tribal members how to harvest, preserve, and prepare wild foods as well as how to grow food in gardens and high tunnels.

Joy works with tribal youth programs to teach kids how to garden. She takes families on hikes to wild-harvest and identify traditional plants, food, and medicines. She has helped when youth have been taught traditional spearfishing and ricing skills.

“To be out on a beautiful Northern Wisconsin lake in the middle of the night with children who are reclaiming their rights and skills to feed themselves has been profound,” Joy said.

Tribal chairman, Mike Wiggins, praised the program and its impact on the community. “Every kid can learn ways to produce and harvest enough food for themselves, for their families, and to share with others within the tribal community. Tribalism is sharing, recognizing we’re a part of, not apart from, our community, and that we’re also a part of the natural world around us.”

Learn more about the program in this acceptance speech.

Read about the Bad River Food Sovereignty Program in the Organic Broadcaster.

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2020 Changemaker

 

Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin

Regenerative Agriculture Alliance

Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin

Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin is a native Guatemalan who came to the U.S. in 1992 and now lives in Northfield, Minnesota, with his family. With degrees in agronomy and international business administration, he has worked in rural development and been an advocate for fair trade for over 30 years.

His influence in organic and regenerative agriculture has been far-reaching. He was an advisor to the United Nations Development Program’s Bureau for Latin America and the World Council of Indigenous Peoples. He directed the fair-trade program for the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. He helped found Peace Coffee, a Minnesota-based fair-trade coffee company. He was also involved in establishing Main Street Project, a Minnesota-based organization that is developing a poultry-centered regenerative agriculture system to change how food is produced and how small-scale farmers make a living.

He recently established the Regenerative Agriculture Alliance, an ecosystem of people and organizations committed to higher standards in food production and supply-chain management.

Learn more about Regi’s work in this acceptance speech.

Read Regi’s profile in the Organic Broadcaster.

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